Jenna Brown
Does CBD work as a sleep aid?

Does CBD Work as a Sleep Aid?

More than 70 million Americans are affected by sleep disorders. There are more than 80 identified sleep disorders that include conditions such as insomnia, sleep apnea, restless leg syndrome and circadian rhythm disorders.(1) In fact, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has said that insufficient sleep is a public health epidemic.

Getting too few hours of sleep, or poor quality sleep, is linked to a myriad of health issues like heart disease, diabetes, obesity, depression, and inflammation.(2) Conversely, adequate sleep is great for your immune system, allows your body to repair itself, processes emotions and experiences from your day, and helps maintain metabolic function. (3)

It’s no wonder that most of us are obsessed with getting a good night’s sleep! In addition to proper nutrition and exercise, adequate sleep is essential to good health.

CBD Oil and the Endocannabinoid System

With the exploding interest in cannabidiol (CBD) as a potential natural remedy for almost everything, it makes sense that many people have started to turn to CBD, to help them sleep.

CBD is a phytocannabinoid, or, a chemical compound that naturally occurs in cannabis. There are currently over 100 phytocannabinoids in cannabis that have been identified. Cannabinoids interact with the body’s endocannabinoid system (ECS) to balance pleasure, energy and well-being. A healthy, operating ECS works to gently prod the body back to a healthy state when facing injury or disease.

You can learn more about this by reading our article about the Endocannabinoid System and how CBD works with it.

Studies on CBD as a Sleep Aid

The question is, even though many people are trying CBD products to help them sleep… is it working?

Thorough studies on CBD as a sleep aid are still few and far between, but here are some of the more notable ones:

Cannabidiol in Anxiety and Sleep: A Large Case Series

In this study, CBD was given to 72 adults that were being clinically treated for anxiety and poor sleep. The patients were given 25mg of CBD after dinner. A few patients ended up increasing their CBD dose throughout the trial. After one month, 66.8% of patients reported better sleep, and 79.2% reported a decrease in anxiety symptoms.

Effectiveness of Raw, Natural Medical Cannabis Flower for Treating Insomnia under Naturalistic Conditions

This study looked at the symptoms and cannabis administration of 409 patients with perceived insomnia. This study is not explicitly about CBD, and some patients used cannabis products containing THC. However, the summary states that, “Cannabidiol (CBD) was associated with greater statistically significant symptom relief.” This is a somewhat broad strokes study but does show potential promise.

Effect of cannabidiol on sleep disruption induced by the repeated combination tests consisting of open field and elevated plus-maze in rats

PTSD patients often report insomnia and REM sleep abnormalities. In this study, researchers compared the effects of CBD on sleep in normal rats vs. rats they induced PTSD symptoms in. They confirmed that CBD does have anxiety reducing effects. When given CBD to aid in non-REM and REM sleep, the study showed that CBD helped to improve REM sleep, but not non-REM sleep.

Cannabis, Cannabinoids, and Sleep: a Review of the Literature

A review of the available research was summarized to suggest that annabidiol (CBD) may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of insomnia.

In this article by Consumer Reports, Dr. Joseph Maroon, MD suggests that CBD may work more indirectly with sleep by eliminating other factors that may keep you awake. Reducing pain, anxious thoughts or other negative symptoms with CBD oil, may in turn help you to sleep better.

To summarize, CBD may treat many of the root causes of poor sleep, allowing you to sleep better, but may not directly cause you to sleep better.

Customer Testimonials

Even though there isn’t an overwhelming body of evidence to suggest that CBD is a cure-all sleep aid, we do have anecdotal evidence from several customers. Here is what some of our customers have to say:

Customer Sarah F. says, “My hormones have been all over the place since I had ovarian cancer two years ago. The worst part is that it affects my sleep. I tried the tincture, and now I can get to sleep without a problem! Sometimes I wake up at 1 or 2 in the morning, but I just take a little more and fall back to sleep pretty quickly. Thank you!”

Guidelines for Taking CBD for Insomnia & Sleep Issues

Hope Botanicals offers CBD Oil products in tinctures, gel caps and gummies. Most of the studies that we looked at used 25mg-50mg as the dose, and were administered after dinner, or about one hour before bed.

For a more in-depth explanation about how much CBD to take, please read our article.

It is important to note that most people on a CBD regimen report that the positive effects of CBD build up over time, and are not always immediate.

The effectiveness of CBD depends largely on the underlying causes of a sleep disorder, individual factors such as how quickly CBD is metabolized, and the dose.

There are virtually no reported ill effects of CBD, as opposed to many pharmaceuticals that are available to use as sleep aids. Overall, CBD is a very safe and natural supplement that can benefit many people.

Disclaimer
These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
All content found on the Hope Botanicals website were created for informational purposes only. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

(1) https://www.sleephealth.org/sleep-health/the-state-of-sleephealth-in-america/
(2) https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/10-reasons-why-good-sleep-is-important
(3) https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/how-much-sleep-you-need#section1

Is CBD an effective sleep aid?

how much cbd should I take? Picture of a dropper of CBD oil

How Much CBD Should I Take?

Probably the most common question we get asked is, “how much CBD should I take?” or “how much CBD should I give my dog/horse/animal?” However, figuring out an ideal CBD dosage isn’t completely straightforward.

There are several factors to consider when starting a CBD regimen. Things like what condition you are treating, the delivery method (tinctures, soft gels, pellets, etc.), concentration of CBD in the product you are using, and your personal sensitivity/responsiveness to CBD.

We will look at each of these factors in turn.

Purity of CBD Product

Before you can decide how much CBD you will take, you must know the concentration of CBD in your product.

The concentration of CBD varies from product to product. Unfortunately, many producers will leave this information off the label, and you won’t know how much CBD your product actually contains. Because this isn’t regulated, it is up to you to do your research and request this information from the manufacturer. Reputable manufacturers will conduct 3rd party testing to confirm the concentration of their products.

We include this information for all our products, which makes measuring and dosing easy and accurate!

Form of CBD Product

You can get CBD in many different forms including tinctures, gel caps, gummies, topical salves and balms, and inhalants.

Each of these will have different concentrations of CBD in them. They also have different levels of bioavailability, and reaction and duration times.

Usually an oral supplement like a tincture or gel cap will last longer in your system than something administered topically. Oral supplements will work in your system roughly 4-8 hours, and topical supplements will last roughly 2-4 hours. It is important to know that this varies for everyone, based on how quickly you metabolize CBD, etc.

Most people find that they can feel topical CBD products working within about 15 minutes of application, and oral supplements within about 30 minutes of taking.

What Illness or Condition are you Treating?

Another factor to consider when figuring out how much CBD to take is what condition you are treating.

Micro Doses (up to 20mg per dose, two times a day)

Low (or “micro”) doses are usually appropriate for conditions like headaches, sleep disorders, nausea and general stress.

Standard Doses (10-100mg per dose, two times a day)

Mid-range doses are recommended for treating conditions like pain, autoimmune disorders, fibromyalgia, depression and anxiety, IBS and autism.

High Doses (50-800mg per dose, two times a day)

Therapeutic (high) doses are recommended for cancer, seizure disorders, liver disease and other life threatening illnesses.

Someone trying CBD for general wellness and to treat minor aches and pains would start off with a much smaller dose than someone battling aggressive cancer.

Individual Factors

Given the ranges above, how each person reacts to CBD is highly individual. Everyone processes and metabolizes CBD differently. Depending on the state of your endocannabinoid system, you can be more or less sensitive to CBD.

These things are nearly impossible to tell up front, until you have started a CBD regimen and have begun to experiment with it.

Other things that can influence how you react to CBD are your body weight, other medications that you are taking, and your diet and overall health.

If you have any questions about medications that you are currently taking, you should reach out to your medical doctor.

Finding Your Optimal CBD Dose

Ultimately, determining your perfect dose amount is done through trial and error. Always start with the minimum dose you think you need, and add from there.

  1. Start with a minimum dose and maintain that dose for two days. Take your CBD at least a half an hour before eating so that it is more readily absorbed.
  2. Notice any side effects or reactions (extremely rare.) If you have any adverse effects, halve your dose and take this new, smaller dose for a few days before trying to build back up.
  3. Note that it does take time for CBD to build up in your system. This is why it is important to increase your doses slowly, to allow you to get a good idea of how you feel.
  4. Continue to increase your CBD dose, until you experience a decrease in benefit, or have any adverse reactions.

The great news is that it is nearly impossible to “overdose” on CBD, and there are no known fatalities from overdosing on cannabis. Note that this article is specific to CBD, without the presence of THC.

What other questions do you have about how much CBD to take?

Disclaimer : All content found on the Hope Botanicals website has been created for informational purposes only. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

how much CBD should I take?

What is the difference between cbd oil and hemp oil, or hemp seed oil, or hemp extract?

What’s the Difference? CBD Oil vs Hemp Oil, Hemp Extract or Hemp Seed Oil

CBD Oil vs. Hemp Oil vs. Hemp Extract vs. Hemp Seed Oil

There is a lot of confusion about the differences between hemp oil vs. hemp seed oil, CBD oil, or hemp extract. Most of this confusion stems from the fact that hemp and marijuana plants are from the same Genus (or category) called Cannabis.

Within this Genus there are three species, but many subtypes, often called strains (but more properly called cultivars.)
People grow hemp for incorporation into other products. These products range from clothing to paper to makeup to cereal. Hemp is really a raw material. Think of it like other resources such as cotton and wood.

Using hemp as a raw material was common prior to early last century.  People used hemp for paper, for clothing, and for rope.

Hemp seed oil is most often sourced from the Cannabis Sativa plant seed, also known as Industrial Hemp. Hemp seed oil production is regulated, and is tested for THC and CBD levels. However, hemp seed oil contains neither of those cannabinoids. Tests have shown that there are no cannabinoids present in the seeds of the hemp plant.

Hemp Seed Oil Nutrition

So just some quick nutrition information! Hemp seed oil contains a fatty acid profile of 4:1. For most people, an omega-6 to omega-3 ratio of 4:1 is ideal–that’s 4 omega-6s for every 1 omega-3. Anti-aging experts suggest even smaller ratios, maintaining a 1:1 ratio or higher in favor of omega-3s. 4.

The average American eats a ratio of anywhere from 12:1 to 25:1 omega-6 to omega-3. Not good. So Hemp seed oil is a good option for an oil with a good fatty acid profile.

CBD Oil, Hemp Extract or Hemp Oil

CBD Oil, Hemp Extract or Hemp Oil (not hemp SEED oil) is an extract that contains naturally occurring terpenes, flavonoids, Cannabinoids, and other beneficial phytonutrients from the hemp plant. They often refer to CBD oil to as “Hemp Extract” or “Phytocannabinoid-Rich Hemp Oil.”

Cannabis Oil

Cannabis oil is commonly from the marijuana plant but can vary depending on the manufacturer as Cannabis is also the botanical name of the Industrial Hemp plant. Cannabis oil from the Marijuana strain is extracted from the Marijuana plant. It contains high levels of THC and lower levels of CBD Oil. Cannabis oil from the Marijuana plant is illegal in most states. People use it for medicinal purposes and as a recreational drug. Cannabis oil production is not regulated.

Hope Botanicals sells THC free products and well as one product that contains the federal allowable limit of THC at 0.3% or less.

FAQ: Questions and Answers

Q: Is Hemp seed oil the same as Hemp Extract/CBD Oil/Hemp Oil or medicinal cannabis oil?

A: No, Hemp seed oil and CBD oil both are made from the same plant though. Hemp seed oil is beneficial containing a lot of antioxidants and omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. Hemp seed oil is pressed from the seeds of the hemp plant. This means it contains little to no CBD or THC.  Hemp seed oil is often sold in 16oz bottles to 1 gallon jugs.

Q: Will CBD oil make me fail a drug test?

A: Depends. A lot of products contain a small amount of THC (usually the federal allowable amount of 0.3% or less) and if you use this, you will fail a drug test. If a drug test is a concern, you’ll want to find a product that contains 0 THC and says so on the label. If it doesn’t say “0 THC” on the label, it likely contains THC. Labs should be available on any product you purchase.

Another option is to purchase a CBD isolate which means all other cannabinoids and THC have been removed from the oil in a lab.

Hope Botanicals carries mostly 0 THC products, CBD isolate (called Hope Rx Clear) and one product, Super Full Spectrum Tincture, which contains 0.3% THC or less (0.3% is the federal allowable amount of THC). We use Hemp Seed Oil as the carrier oil for all our tinctures as we believe there is a natural occurring synergy between Hemp Seed Oil and CBD oil.

Q: How do I understand the label?

A. To delve further into the names for CBD oil, you will see labels that say “Full Spectrum” and “Broad Spectrum”. Full spectrum generally indicates the oil contains some THC, because full spectrum oil is mostly known as containing multiple cannabinoids, including THC. But with the advent of new extraction technology, labs can now extract the THC and leave behind multiple cannabinoids. So, to see a label that says “Full Spectrum with 0 THC” is not uncommon.

Broad Spectrum has generally been the term for oil that contains CBD with no THC, with slight amounts of other cannabinoids. Once again, new technology is enabling labs to extract the THC and leave behind other cannabinoids.

To emphasize the point, if you’re looking for a CBD product that contains 0 THC, look for “0 THC” on the label.

Hope Botanicals uses the terms CBD, Phytocannabinoid-rich Hemp Oil, Full Spectrum and Super Full Spectrum.

You can always contact us for more information on products. We know it can be confusing and we want to help you figure out which product is best for you, your horse and your pets.

CBD Oil vs. Hemp Oil. What is the difference? What is hemp extract and hemp seed oil?

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